April 1, 2020

This deadly virus hit us hard and precipitately. Yet, its full reality seems to be unfolding ever so slowly in front of us. Our mind cannot fully absorb what is exactly happening to our life. Over just a matter of two weeks, which seems an eternity, we are forced to rearrange our life as we know it.

Yet, the basic approach to life hasn't changed. The fundamental truth about life is we are intricately connected with everyone else. Everything is related. A mature society is, thus, always willing to take care of its poorest and weakest members. There are always more advanced souls who would rise to protect others first. They are plainly visible if we care to look. They point us how we shall overcome this dark period together.

At Earth Sangha, we've changed a lot...

November 12, 2019

In my line of work, I engage in extensive, if casual, surveying of native flora in the wild areas of Northern Virginia. For nearly twenty years, I've made it my job checking on the general conditions of our region's wild areas, or rather the remnants of once wild areas, in every season. Mind you, my kind of survey is a non-scientific activity. Just a visual survey with the understanding of a hobby-naturalist.

Yet, you get to learn a lot from this repeated observations over the same areas. I take the trouble visiting all the nooks and crannies of our public and non-public lands where native plants are growing. And repeatedly over the years. I've noticed how the topography change over time and how plants interact with both natural and artificial physical chang...

September 4, 2019

This particular standing of Maple-Leaf Viburnum is now decimated by Bradford Pears.

Some years ago, we worked with NPS in DC to create edge-of-the woodland meadows.

Exotic Olive trees. Sadly, this is a common feature of our forest edges.

There is little doubt that our local wild areas have been in decline. This, in spite of increased awareness and efforts of many conscientious and hard-working individuals, organizations, and local park systems to turn around this negative trend. Forest communities, like our region's temperate deciduous forests, are living organisms and always changing. The forest ecology is neither random nor simple. Every part of a community, whether organic or non-organic, is influencing one another. Together, they've built a system of ecolo...

June 3, 2019

Photo: Carex jamesii on the floodplain slope. See the Common Hackberry trunk?

This has been an exceptionally brilliant spring. With cool temperature and frequent rains, our native early Carex species and ephemerals bloomed profusely. One of my favorite sites of spring is this floodplain forest near Manassas. The forest is known for calcareous and mafic rocks, and the slopes on the above photo host many attractive native plants.

On top, Witch Hazel and Maple-Leaf viburnum dominate the forest. Closer to the ground, Lowbush Blueberry (Vaccinium pallidum). What really interests me is the kind of vegetation on the slope. The slope is sparsely vegetated, almost always moist with thin moss visible throughout the year. The ground covers are mostly Dwarf Cinquefoil (P...

Please reload

Featured Posts

When the Most Common Native Plants become No Longer Common in our Wild Areas

November 12, 2019

1/4
Please reload

Recent Posts

January 31, 2019

Please reload

Archive
Please reload

Search By Tags
Please reload

Follow Us
  • Wix Facebook page
  • Twitter Classic
  • YouTube Social  Icon

Banner: Late October in a mixed stand of hickories, oaks, and American beech at Fountainhead Regional Park, on the northern shore of the Occoquan River, in Fairfax County, Virginia. Photo by Chris Bright. 

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon

© 2020 by Earth Sangha | All rights reserved

info@earthsangha.org | 703.333.3022